Jeffrey A. Andresen
Jeffrey A. Andresen

Jeffrey A. Andresen, Ph.D., is associate professor and the State Climatologist for Michigan with Michigan State University’s Department of Geography. Dr. Andresen is Co-Director (with Julie Winkler) of the Pileus Project, with a focus on the influence of weather and climate on regional tart cherry production and on grain quality. Jeff also oversees the development and analysis of historical climatological data used in the project and the integration of decision-support tools.

A native of the Quad Cities area of Iowa/Illinois, he obtained a Bachelor of Science degree from Northern Illinois University in the field of meteorology, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Purdue University in the field of agricultural meteorology/climatology. Dr. Andresen has professional experience as an agricultural meteorologist with the National Weather Service and with the USDA's World Agricultural Outlook Board in Washington, D.C., where he was involved in international crop/weather impact assessment and production estimation. He currently serves as director of the Michigan Climatological Resources Program and associated extension/outreach activities, including administration of the Michigan Automated Weather Network (MAWN), a network of automated weather stations designed to provide quality, detailed weather data to the state’s agricultural industry over the Internet. Teaching responsibilities include courses in agricultural climatology, meteorology, and physical geography. The primary focus of Andresen’s research has been the influence of weather and climate on agriculture, especially within Michigan and the Great Lakes Region. Current and past themes include; climatological trends and potential impacts, water use for agricultural irrigation, impacts associated with potential future changes in climate, weather and risk management in agricultural production systems, influence of land use changes on regional climate, winter hardiness and mortality of crops and insects, and the measurement and use of weather data for determination of plant disease risk.

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